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Pilch

Day of the Doctor Trailer

1 min read

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HpRkwN7QM2wdoctorwho:

IT’S FINALLY HERE.The official clip trailer for the Doctor Who 50th Anniversary special, ‘The Day of the Doctor’.

(Psst. If you’re on the YouTubes, you can subscribe to BBCAmerica because they’ll be posting a second, special exclusive trailer tomorrow!)

Pilch

'Virtuous' circles of software

8 min read

I started a list several months ago of iOS-first applications that had everything to gain from launching on  but seemingly just decided not to. Far from complete, and probably like the third post I had ever written on anything, but it was a start. Anyways, this morning on All About Android I heard about this guy who tried to elucidate the point in probably the most smug way possible. The tone makes me feel like he would carry hand sanitizer around just in case he accidentally touched an HTC One. So here is my attempt to FJM this whole thing.

photo: Andy Ihnatko via Compfight

1. "In the US, iOS market share is still extremely strong (even pre-iPhone 5s launch data showed Android having peaked, so Q4 data will be interesting with Apple’s refresh)

Well, since you aren’t going to bother with data, I guess I will: Android covers 52% of the US market to iOS’s 40%. But, if you want to go anecdotally too, I know someone who is dropping iOS entirely because of a gamebreaking iOS7 bug that neither AT&T nor Apple has remedied. This makes me doubt that will make up that 12% gap in Q4.

 Since the vast majority of innovative mobile startups come out of the US, Apple’s stronghold domestically has an absolutely massive impact on developer mindshare

Yes, there are a lot of US startups, because there are a lot of US VCs with a lot of disposable income. Apple’s “stronghold” doesn’t impact developer mindshare, it impacts VC mindshare, because they fall into iOS’s affluent demographic. It is a status symbol to them. That doesn’t make it better or easier to develop for.

2. All of my conversations over the past year with Android developers…  building and releasing on Android costs 2-3x more than iOS.

Ok, anecdotal again. Here’s an anecdote: Any.DO (just featured on The Verge for inspiring the design of iOS7 you love so much) started… on Android! DUN DUN DUN! It built up the hype there before hitting iOS, and I would say it worked out well for them.

3. The effort required to build and release an app is severely gated by capital-raising…

4. These structural limitations around capital raising for venture-backed companies…

*yawn* First world problems. You don’t even use the word ‘mobile’ (let alone ‘iOS’) until #5.

5. To build a mobile app with $1M in capital, a startup can roughly afford to hire one designer, one client developer (iOS or Android) and one back end engineer

Here is the bias. You know who had more than one of each of these (and definitely more capital)? Twitter, after buying Vine. They had nearly 3 months to at least add viewing capability for their Android client before its public release, which was already iOS-only anyway. But maybe that is a bad example. Again, Any.DO shows that you can do Android just as well with the same ‘constraints’.

6. Almost zero startups are going Android-first under these constraints. Why? Because founders know they have an extremely high bar to prove traction on the primary platform, before they can raise additional financing and accelerate into two platforms

Again, this is a fallacy - see my answer to #2 again. Unless you think the “extremely high bar” is somehow lower on iOS. And it might be, when you have (generally) affluent guys paying (generally) affluent guys to create an app for a platform used by (generally) affluent people. It would be hard to get that kind of ‘vision’ to sync across stages of development on platforms with a more diverse base of users.

7. So it’s well known in tech circles today that seed round sizes constrain app development to a single primary platform.

Ok, that may be a point. My broken-record answer of Any.DO did start on only one platform, and most others start on the other platform. But in general, I would ignore any sentence featuring the phrase ‘it’s well known in tech circles’, much like ‘quantum mechanics.’

image

And startups are choosing to go iOS first not only because development is cheaper and easier, but also because money for in-app purchases and advertising is overwhelmingly skewed toward iOS 

This may be true. Once again, I will do your research for you, instead of relying on ‘tech circles’ - Play Store revenue is up to 35% of global app revenue market share, leaving Apple with a huge advantage. It may never be on par with Apple here, but it is hard to compete with an install base of (generally) affluent (generally) white users.

In fact, a recent study of Facebook ads shows ads were 1,790% more profitable on iOS. This is extremely incriminating for Android and is the worst kind of news for Google.

What do Facebook ads have to do with anything? I see Facebook ads on my Galaxy Note 2, and they suck because they are not relevant to me, so I don’t click on them. I only see them in the Facebook app, which is not made by a startup, and probably launched on both platforms as quickly as humanly possible. It is not bad news for Google, it is bad news for Facebook on Android.

You want incriminating? Ad revenue generated on iOS has fallen 11% in market share since last year, while Android has remained steady. I didn’t even have to use a ridiculously large number from a third party that has nothing to do with my overall point.

8. Since iOS better supports startups’ ability to prove metrics requisite for raising Series A rounds from institutional investors, the earliest most innovative services are almost always available first on iOS.

The metrics you gave in #3 were: significant traction, repeatable user acquisition strategy, early ideas toward monetization, etc. What do those have to do with platform at all? Download counts and active users are easily found in the Play Store and its developer console. User acquisition is definitely platform agnostic, and if anything, Android users can get the word out about a new app they are using with the built-in share menu that is light years ahead of iOS. And - repeat - see #2 to show it can be done.

9. … often these startups become acquihires for the top mobile acquirers (FB, Google, Apple, Yahoo, Dropbox, etc). Because they are almost always shutdown at acquihire, big companies often have some of the most talented iOS engineers and product people in residence for a 1 to 2 year earn-out period. Without a doubt, these employees skew toward iOS when they join internal projects or think up new ideas. And when they eventually leave, there is a good chance they’ll stick with iOS again. There is no doubt this forms a sort of virtuous circle of iOS-first talent in the startup community.

This is a symptom, not a cause. You can substitute Android for iOS in that paragraph, and it would be a symptom of Android-first, not the cause of it. And why is this ‘virtuous’? Did you mean to type ‘vicious,’ but your iPhone keyboard autocorrected it? A little Freudian if you ask me.

While in theory Android provides a very modern platform for mobile development,

Gravity is also a theory.

Startups simply cannot afford to bypass iOS and go Android out of the gate. One could even argue the gap is widening.

The gap is widening only in the minds of people like you. You perpetuate this stereotype, and this is the reason companies that are not startups, like Nike, completely skip over half the mobile market in favor of the first choice among the (generally) affluent ‘tech circles.’

The reality is that software innovation at the app layer is accelerating, and converged hardware / software development costs a lot of money.

It is accelerating because there is competition. And starting on a certain platform before moving to another does cost money, but that is not a reason to start on the same platform every time. The startup issue is a chicken and egg scenario, and nothing is going to change until VCs start laying their eggs on the other side of the proverbial fence.

Pilch

Day of the Doctor teaser trailer

1 min read

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0AX8rgJ8f0doctorwho:

Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Tribute: “The Day of The Doctor” November 23, 2013

Celebrate 50 Years of Doctor Who with this specially-shot tribute in advance of the special 50th Anniversary episode, “The Day of The Doctor” premiering SAT NOVEMBER 23 on BBC AMERICA, BBC One, Space Channel and in 75 countries around the globe.

Pilch

Obamacare

1 min read

Obamacare is really the worst thing that has happened in this nation since slavery. It is slavery, in a way.

Neurosurgeon Ben Carson describing Obamacare during the 2013 Value Voters Summit, as tweeted by The Atlantic’s Molly Ball. (via officialssay)

Pilch

wanna get away

3 min read

I can’t decide if flying Southwest is worth it or not. It is generally not that much cheaper than Delta, especially to regional stops. The free checked bags are nice - I paid a few hundred dollars to fly myself here, I’m not putting up another $35 for my belongings to go too. But the vibe feels a little off-putting, and I am pretty sure it is their “seat yourself” policy.

We got on in the early B group for a couple flights, so we got on behind roughly 60 people. None of them sit together apparently. Each time, they filled up the first 20 or so rows by taking the aisle and window seats, and leaving the middle. They all know goddamn well that it was a full flight, and this is just going to slow everyone down, but they did it anyway. Then on our return flights, I didn’t check in until a few hours before, which means to Southwest you might as well be riding with the luggage. Sure enough, the 120 or so people had sat in 4 columns through the back of the plane, middle seats the only ones left. I understand the middle seat can be uncomfortable or whatever, but the lady in the aisle seat next to my wife had her husband sitting in the aisle seat directly across from her. Who does that? The lady had a Louis Vuitton bag. Who flies Southwest with a Louis Vuitton bag? And sits in the back of the plane?

I paid the upgrade fee for the last leg home to get on the plane first. I just wanted to sit with my wife and watch Doctor Who on my tablet. I bought a headphone splitter weeks ago. And on Delta, or whatever other airline you like, I would have known weeks ago that we were sitting together and could use it, even if we were the last people to board. Sure, I would have to lug my suitcase on with me, but you know what? Everyone does this on Southwest too. I don’t know if they aren’t aware or just pack way too much. Our last plane was delayed 15 minutes because seemingly everyone checked 2 bags, and they took their sweet time loading them up.

So there it is. The Southwest upcharge isn’t hidden with bags. It is hidden in your flight experience. It is a weird combination of party bus and muted commuter hostility that you have to pay to escape — well, not even “escape”, but “get in front of”. It works going to Vegas, but is a little bit off everywhere else.

Stray observations:

  • The percentage of passengers who will talk to you goes from maybe 5% on other airlines to about 40% on a Southwest flight, in my experience. It is pleasant conversation, usually.
  • Lot of gray hairs. I don’t know enough to attribute it to flying on a Monday or to the airline, but a lot of them had coupons.
  • Glad I got to travel before “TSA agents” turned into “unpaid TSA agents.”

via Tumblr http://craigpilcher.tumblr.com/post/62950281702

photo credit: Mark Stevens via Compfight

Pilch

NYC

1 min read

It’s like Jay-Z said, “Concrete bunghole where dreams are made up, there’s nothing you can do.”

Liz Lemon

Pilch

Screenshot of despair

1 min read

haha my submission made it

Pilch

Party

1 min read

animalstalkinginallcaps:

SO GREG’S HOUSE. TEN O’CLOCK. TONS OF GOOD LOOKING BABES, TONS OF BOOZE, EVEN A COUPLE OF BANDS.THAT SOUNDS AWESOME. DOES STEVEN KNOW?

OF COURSE NOT. WHY WOULD I TELL STEVEN ABOUT A PARTY FULL OF BABES? IF HE ASKS WHAT YOU’RE DOING LATER JUST SAY YOU’VE GOT A COLD OR SOMETHING. 

YOU TWO DICKWADS CAN STOP WHISPERING. I CAN HEAR YOUR WHOLE CONVERSATION. I’M UGLY, NOT DEAF.

Pilch

Mescaline

1 min read

animalstalkinginallcaps:

GOOD MORNING. HOW ARE YOU ENJOYING THE MESCALINE?

<I CAN READ YOUR THOUGHTS>

ARE YOU THIRSTY? I’VE MADE SOME NICE HERBAL TEA.

<IT’S POISON>

IS EVERYTHING OKAY?

<THERE IS NOTHING AFTER DEATH>

[preorder the book]

Pilch

Caught on tape

1 min read

I responded in what I thought was the most truthful, or least untruthful manner by saying no.

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, explaining why he asserted in March that the NSA was not gathering data on millions of Americans in an interview with NBC’s Andrea Mitchell.  (via officialssay)

Pilch

Dragons

1 min read

paulftompkins:

“Like, imagine if they just, like, made a big cash grab and instead of breathing fire, they took money from corporations to breathe, like, little clouds that said ‘I’m lovin’ it’ or whatever. Hm. You know, I’m not very good at being a high person. Here. You’re welcome to finish the rest of this jointed cigarette. I think there’s a few more licks in it. Best of luck. Four and twenty, you old blackbird! Right? Yes? No? Okay. TAXI.”

Pilch

Pilch

The Verge: Offline

1 min read

thisistheverge:

I’m still here: back online after a year without the internetPaul Miller returns after a year off the internet.

I was wrong.

One year ago I left the internet. I thought it was making me unproductive. I thought it lacked meaning. I thought it was “corrupting my soul.” It’s a been a year now since I “surfed the web” or “checked my email” or “liked” anything with a figurative rather than literal thumbs up. I’ve managed to stay disconnected, just like I planned. I’m internet free.

And now I’m supposed to tell you how it solved all my problems. I’m supposed to be enlightened. I’m supposed to be more “real,” now. More perfect.

Pilch